Monday, 26 March 2012

Finchley N Gauge Scenic Model Railway Layout Part 9 Imitation Puddles

N gauge class 08 shunter reflected in a yard puddle
 
As I stated in my last blog post dated 20 March 2012, Finchley is an N gauge test model built to explore how reflective qualities may be incorporated into micro layout scenery.  The benefits of this exercise are already becoming apparent.

I wanted to create imitation puddles in areas which would suffer the most wear during normal day to day activities.  Having already created a highly reflective imitation pond using glass, I wondered if I could use the same media whilst creating the goods yard.

I attempted to cut some small pieces of glass, very successfully this time thanks to the purchase of a new glass cutter.  I dotted the pieces of glass around the edges of the goods yard and moved them here and there until I felt that they were all sat in logical places.  I drew around the pieces of glass, cut into the baseboard along the outlines using an appropriate knife, then dug out the waste wood with a chisel.

I painted the bottom of the glass components before fixing them into the hollows I had made in the baseboard.  I was able to hide the angular nature of the glass pieces by creating an irregular outline around each puddle whilst surfacing the goods yard.

Though a fiddly and surprisingly time consuming process, I felt that the results were well worth the work.
 
 
N gauge class 08 shunter with coupling rods and steps reflected in a yard puddle
 
 
N gauge class 08 shunter bodywork reflected in a yard puddle
 
 
N gauge class 08 with coupling rods reflected in a yard puddle
 
The photographs of the intricately detailed N gauge class 08 locomotive show coupling rods, locomotive number, handrails etc. clearly and sharply reflected in the puddles.  Cleaning surfaces made of plastic, or those which have been painted and varnished, can sometimes result in a build up of micro scratches which dull the surface over time.  I have found it easy to clean dust from the glass and restore the reflective quality.  I feel that this is a definite improvement which I will incorporate into model railway layout baseboards I build in the future.

I anticipate that reflections observed as rolling stock is shunted around Finchley could provide much more visual interest during normal operations.  I feel that this could be a great benefit to minimum space model railways which often need as many features as possible packed into an aesthetically balanced arrangement.

To see details of more scenic model railway layouts I have built visit www.brianford.co.uk.

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